Vote Referendum 29th February – Meeting 7pm Band room 22nd February 2024

– you will receive a polling card or postal vote. 

Read Cranleigh Society’s summary of the Neighbourhood Plan below.  

 The full document is here – Don’t forget to vote on 29th Feb.

Cranleigh Society meeting to discuss and clarify the Neighbourhood Plan – Band room meeting on 22nd February, from 7pm.

We recommend you vote in favour of the adoption of Cranleigh Neighbourhood Plan.  Other areas that have adopted theirs report positive results when their planning authorities receive applications. 

The  Plan emphasises the things we value – village feel, caring for wildlife, trees and ancient woodlands, open fields, waterways, beautiful views, footpaths, buildings that blend in and are actively eco-friendly, maintaining thriving businesses and services, caring for each other. 

The Plan makes clear that Cranleigh Cares and the planning system must help to maintain all aspects of that approach. 

It is imperative that pressure is up kept on all services, Surrey County Council,  Waverly Borough Council and Cranleigh Parish Council to ensure that infrastructure is significantly improved prior to any further development being considered in and around the village of Cranleigh Parish.  This is the time to join Cranleigh Society’s team and help. 

The Neighbourhood Plan for Cranleigh is the Parish’s plan for land use up to 2032.  It was started in July 2013 by the Cranleigh Parish Council and many volunteers from our community contributed their time and ideas. The Plan has been changed several times as required by the process and been subject to Government examinations. The words are now agreed by Government inspectors. The Referendum provides the chance to adopt the plan.  In the lifetime of the plan, if more buildings are given planning permission, Cranleigh will receive increased Developer Contributions (CIL) – up from 15% capped to 25% uncapped.

SUMMARY OF CRANLEIGH NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN – REFERENDUM VERSION JANUARY 2024 –

 by Cranleigh Civic Society team  (n.b. most sentences are from the document, others are summaries.)

VISION The vision statement was developed through engagement with the local community.

‘In 2032, Cranleigh will have maintained its village character, whilst adapting to the needs of a diverse and growing community with well-designed, sympathetic development and protected green spaces.’

 Introduction

The Neighbourhood Plan for Cranleigh is the Parish’s plan for land use 2021 up to 2032.

Cranleigh is a community with key services, similar to the three other main centres in Waverley Borough – Farnham, Godalming and Haslemere.  Housing developments are added to these four areas in particular.

The Neighbourhood Plan, being led by the Parish Council, started back in 2013. The Parish Council had the opportunity to ask the people of Cranleigh to have a say in the future of the village and more importantly to help to decide where new housing should go rather than leaving the decision to Waverley Borough Council.

The main objective is that in the years ahead further development will only be worthwhile if it makes a positive difference to the lives of local people and the future of the local economy.

This Neighbourhood Plan forms part of the Development Plan and sits alongside the Waverley Local Plan. Decisions on planning applications in the Parish will be made using both of these documents alongside National Planning Policy and attending to all the laws that pertain.

BOUNDARIES,  POPULATION, DEVELOPERS’ CONTRIBUTIONS

The Neighbourhood Plan area is contiguous with the Cranleigh Parish boundary.

Cranleigh’s population has grown steadily and almost doubled to 12,707 since the 1960’s. This growth is continuing and since 2015 planning permission has been granted for over 1,700 new dwellings, the vast majority on greenfield sites around the village.

Developer contributions from the new housing being built are already allocated to specific projects so these are outside the scope of the plan.  The Neighbourhood plan can help to shape future projects and plan how the village will develop once it is adopted.

Consultation

In January 2014 Cranleigh residents were invited to two public meetings to find out more about neighbourhood planning. There was a very high level of interest and 156 people signed up to get involved in putting together a Neighbourhood Plan.

This has principally been prepared by volunteers who formed the Cranleigh Neighbourhood Plan Group who investigated transport, housing, employment, infrastructure, community, the environment, design and heritage.

HOUSING & DESIGN

Development

The community expressed the strong view that they want Cranleigh to retain its ‘village feel’ whilst providing for a mix of housing with a variety of tenures to meet the needs of the community over the plan period.

The community stated a strong preference for new development to be located on previously developed brownfield sites.

It is important that development is conveniently located to access local services and facilities and to ensure that sprawl into open countryside is avoided.

The purpose of a settlement boundary is to help to provide that direction. The Cranleigh village settlement boundary incorporates greenfield sites on the edge of the village which have already  been granted planning permission.  N.b. Rowly has a separate settlement boundary, and is all green belt.

STRATEGY, LOCATIONS, HOUSING NUMBERS TO DATE AND PLANNED

Cranleigh is required to deliver a minimum of 1,700 new dwellings over the Local Plan period to 2032. As at 1 September 2022, 1,671 new dwellings had either been completed or were classed as outstanding permissions. With an allowance of 36 dwellings for small windfalls this totals 1,707 dwellings, slightly in excess of the minimum requirement.

An assessment was undertaken of all sites larger than 0.1 hectares resulting in 3 sites being identified which could accommodate approximately 78 dwellings. These are:

SITES

  • POLICY CRAN1A WA/2022/00657 – Land at rear of the former Manns store – approximately 38 retirement dwellings.
  • POLICY CRAN1B Land at west Cranleigh Nurseries and north of Knowle Park and Alfold Road – increase of approximately 36 dwellings.
  • POLICY CRAN1C Land off Bloggs Way – approximately 4 dwellings.

Whilst Cranleigh is not required to accommodate significant further growth over the Neighbourhood Plan period it is important that new development reflects and compliments the character of Cranleigh whilst being of sustainable construction.

HOUSING DESIGN AND CHARACTER OF DEVELOPMENT

  • POLICY CRAN2 – development should demonstrate high quality designs, including good for security, disability and scenic views.
  • POLICY CRAN3 – character of Development – preserve & enhance village feel, high quality, local character, maintain vistas and views – CA1-CA7; COM8 AND COM9; ASV1I1-ASVI5; sustainable, protect countryside, net gains for biodiversity.

ECONOMY

  • POLICY CRAN4 – protecting employment and commercial activity reflecting that this is more than just activity which occurs in offices and industrial units.

Cranleigh should retain a thriving local economy with local employment and businesses. Cranleigh services many surrounding villages where there are less amenities and work opportunities.

RURAL ECONOMY and RURAL ENTERPRISE

Wey & Arun canal  – the aim to fully restore the canal should be upheld.

  • POLICY CRAN5 – Rural Enterprise and use of Agricultural Buildings for Businessoutside settlement boundaries changes – careful support whilst maintaining environmental value, attraction and views.

ENVIRONMENT, NATURAL LANDSCAPE and RURAL CHARACTER

Residents expressed a strong desire to protect the rural countryside in which Cranleigh sits.

  • POLICY CRAN6 – protecting agricultural land and rural areas for nature and people. Protecting landscape visual impact, agriculture and waterways.
  • POLICY CRAN7- air quality requires improvement and new proposals should be designed to safeguard existing air quality.
  • POLICY CRAN8 – protecting and improving water quality. Nitrate levels must be safeguarded and improved.
  • POLICY CRAN9 – soil quality and erosion – retain the best agricultural land, not increase the risk of soil erosion.

The main river Cranleigh Waters has been classed as eutrophic: this causes a growth of algae and other plant life, leading to low oxygen levels that unbalance the quality of the water and habitat for other organisms including fish, mammals, amphibians and invertebrates.

The river is also ephemeral, drying up for several months at a time, particularly during summer. This lack of flow plus discharge from the sewage treatment works (STW) have had a negative effect on water quality.

The development of new sites will lead to the extensive loss of trees, hedgerows and important wildlife corridors. It would have a wider impact on air and water quality, eradicating natural flood control measures and affects soil conditions. The plan is to protect all these.

The aims of this Neighbourhood plan include conserving the special landscape. The setting of the Surrey Hills Landscape should be protected and enhanced.

New development, including garden infill, has resulted in the cumulative loss of a large number of trees which has resulted in the relocation and undermining of habitats and corridors.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND DESIGN

  • POLICY CRAN10 – solar gain, using renewables, energy resilience, retrofitting older buildings, better water management.

Recent changes to the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) include additional requirements for development to mitigate climate change. Waverley Borough is in an area of serious water stress – Thames Water needs a major resource transfer scheme and all dwellings need to reduce consumption.

Nearly 30% of Cranleigh’s drinking water pipes are constructed of asbestos cement. A growing number of bursts are occurring in these old pipes and planned replacement is under way in some areas.

AREA OF STRATEGIC VISUAL IMPORTANCE (ASVI)

  • POLICY CRAN11 – areas previously designated – at Snoxhall – have been reviewed and further areas added

LOCAL GREEN SPACES

  • POLICY CRAN12 – several parks and spaces variously owned must be cared for.

RESIDENTIAL GARDENS & AMENITY SPACE

  • POLICY CRAN13 – residential gardens are very important to the character of Cranleigh and biodiversity. All new properties must have plenty of space, and also nearby play areas.

FLOODING

The Neighbourhood Plan seeks to help ensure that there is adequate surface water, foul drainage and waste water treatment capacity to serve all new developments whilst ensuring that water quality does not deteriorate further.

Cranleigh is liable to flooding from all sources, surface water, rivers, groundwater and sewage infrastructure as the network becomes quickly overwhelmed in times of heavy rainfall. Much of the recent development has been located on Cranleigh’s natural flood plain to the south of the High Street. The Neighbourhood Plan aims to ensure that, with its history of flooding and considering a predicted increase in severe rainfall events due to climate change, new homes in Cranleigh are built to be flood resilient and designed to minimise pollution from surface water run-off and sewer flooding.  It is normal for water and sewage treatment works to be located close or adjacent to rivers (to abstract water for treatment and supply or to discharge treated effluent). It is likely that these existing works will need to be upgraded or extended to provide the increase in treatment capacity required to service new development.

  • POLICY CRAN 14 – flood risk and drainage development proposals should:
  1. Be accompanied by appropriate details of the proposed surface water drainage scheme including gully maintenance and clearance. This should specifically include details of its route, design and specification, how consideration has been given to the use of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and details of its ongoing management and maintenance for the lifetime of the development.
  2. Use natural flood risk alleviation methods, including floodplain woodland, wetlands and other ‘soft engineering’ techniques.
  3. Ensure that existing drainage ditches and culverts are retained on the development site and, where practicable, enhanced and maintained.
  4. Ensure that adequate sewerage infrastructure is in place to ensure that the risk of sewer flooding is minimised.

INFRASTRUCTURE

ROADS & TRANSPORT

Accidents and flooding on Elmbridge Road (leads into Cranleigh from main A281). The roads are not suitable for more and heavier traffic.

  • POLICY CRAN 15 – transport and movement – It is important that any development sites have safe access other than by car. A short walk is not more than 800 metres.

 RESIDENTIAL PARKING

  • POLICY CRAN16 – new developments must be supported by appropriate car and cycle parking.

WASTEWATER INFRASTRUCTURE AND WATER SUPPLY –

  • POLICY CRAN17 – Development must be designed to be water efficient and reduce water consumption.

Refurbishments and other non-domestic development will be expected to meet BREEAM water efficiency credits. Residential development must not exceed a maximum water use of 105 litres per head per day (excluding the allowance of up to 5 litres for external water consumption.

COMMUNITY LEISURE & WELLBEING – a new Passivhaus leisure centre is in Waverley’s budget.  A new MUGA is in Cranleigh PC’s budget.

PROJECTS AND INVESTMENT PRIORITIES

The following are priorities for investment to retain and enhance leisure and arts activities in

Cranleigh (updated and reviewed in Cranleigh Parish Council 5 year business plan):

  1. The provision and enhancement of publicly accessible buildings and grounds that provide

leisure facilities for all, including community halls and state schools. In particular this includes:

  1. Café at Snoxhall Fields
  2. Multi Use Games Area (MUGA)
  • Improvements to the Play Park
  1. Snoxhall Pavilion modernisation
  2. Miniature running track in a figure of 8 around Snoxhall Fields
  3. Public toilets at Snoxhall Fields Pavilion
  • Drainage improvements to Snoxhall Fields pitches
  • Improvements to football stand, dugouts and pitch fencing at Snoxhall Fields
  1. Provision of a 3G pitch for Cranleigh
  2. An additional adult football pitch at the Bruce McKenzie Field
  3. Tennis court improvements
  • Improvements to the Skate Park
  • Improved community facilities
  • Improvements to Cranleigh Village Hall
  1. Cranleigh Leisure Centre new build
  2. b. The provision and enhancement of arts projects and buildings. In particular this includes:

Cranleigh Arts Centre.

CRANLEIGH VILLAGE HOSPITAL – is a day hospital (no beds) providing a range of out-patient services

CRANLEIGH MEDICAL PRACTICE – increased provision is hoped for and being worked on, especially in the light of anticipated development at Dunsfold.

TRANSPORT AND MOVEMENT –  In order to encourage use of the bus network as an alternative to the car, improvements are being made – bus shelters, safe cycleways and parking.

MONITORING & REVIEW – The Parish Council will monitor the effectiveness of the policies

The Parish Council will also assess the need or otherwise for a full or a partial review of a made Plan throughout the Plan period. Such assessments will be made:

  • if it becomes clear that the delivery of new housing on the three allocated sites will not be achieved in a timely fashion; or
  • if changes to national or local planning policy are so significant that they make the policies in the Plan ineffective or out of date; and
  • at the end of the Plan period.

ENDS………………….

POSSIBLE DEVELOPMENT SITES CCS IS AWARE OF

Whilst three sites for development are included in this Neighbourhood Plan other possible locations for future housing developments may be being considered –

Land off Knowle Lane – approximately 165 dwellings – the appeal has been turned down so a different approach will have to be taken by the land owners

Land behind Seltops Close and Cranleigh Mead – between 300-400 dwellings – no planning applications received

Cranleigh Showground – up to 100 dwellings – Cranleigh Show will go ahead July 14 2024- let’s hope it is a great success

Cranley Hotel – planning application has been sent in to build onto it and convert it all into flats.

CCS  COMMENTS

ECONOMY –The Neighbourhood Plan backs the local and rural economies but does not give specific guidance on how growth should or can be encouraged especially with respect to the regeneration of a vibrant High Street.

INFRASTRUCUTURE –Without adequate improvements future development in and around Cranleigh will exacerbate inadequacies in the existing infrastructure which has yet to be fully updated. It is essential that there is sufficient and functional infrastructure in place to serve any new development to avoid having a further negative impact on existing residents and environment.

FRESH WATER SUPPLY   –These services are under extreme pressure at the moment and a number of cases of discharge of sewage into water courses, and also into people’s homes and streets, have been reported. There is a growing number of burst pipes – again this is increasingly becoming a major problem. Thames Water must commit to replacing Cranleigh’s aging asbestos cement drinking water pipes.

SEWAGE REMOVAL- Upgrades to Cranleigh sewage treatment works are being discussed as is the discharge of effluent into Cranleigh Waters which has extremely low flow rates. The resolution of these issues is becoming increasingly import.

Please comment and join in at the Band room on Thursday 22nd Feb from 7pm, then VOTE on 29th Feb – polling cards and postal votes are on their way from Waverley Parish Council.